How To Eradicate Hatred Against Minorities

We live in troubled times in the United States and throughout the world. Crimes as a result of police brutality such as that of George Floyd and Breonna Taylor and the scandal that arose after the decision of the Calvin Klein brand to use the trans African-American actress Jari Jones in its commercials bring back issues that unfortunately have not been resolved completely: racism, classism, homophobia, transphobia continue to exist among us, although it is painful to accept it.

Millions have mobilized demanding changes and that those responsible are held accountable. We have seen protests with just cause and perhaps some excesses but, as I always say, a crisis is always a great opportunity to improve. The idea is to use all the indignation we feel to peacefully achieve changes in laws, social policies and especially in culture and education that allow us to eradicate once and for all these issues that we have as a society. How to do it?

  • If You Want Change, Start with Yourself: just like the beautiful Michael Jackson song “Man in the Mirror” says. Saying that you are not racist because you have a friend of color, or that you are not homophobic because you have gay acquaintances, is not enough. You can say that you respect them, but … that “but” already implies a certain unconscious discrimination. Do you see them or treat them differently? So, analyze well what you feel about it and how you are acting. And if you have relatives, friends or acquaintances from a minority, love them and respect them without the “buts”.
  • Raise Your Children to Love, Not to Hate: no one is born hating anyone, so all these stereotypes are attitudes that are learned in the environment throughout growing up . Your children will observe what you do and say and will absorb like a sponge what you show them, consciously or unconsciously, to form their own thoughts. Lead them by example and your words not only to “tolerate” but to love and respect others regardless of their color, origin, socioeconomic status or gender preferences.
  • Commit Yourself to Act, in One Way or Another: they do not ask for privileges but the same rights that the majority have, such as marrying, studying, having a job that allows them to live with dignity, express themselves and show themselves as they are without fear, develop their maximum potential, etc. You can actively help them either by creating or signing a petition, by demanding changes in schools and to incorporate this issue broadly into formal education, by following community activists and leaders on social media, or march alongside them.

Only united, despite our differences, can we set an example for future generations a world where love, respect, equality and solidarity predominate. In my social networks @lauraposadalifecoach I support all minorities because I am convinced that “love is love”.